Cross culture comparison of leadership traits

Some knowledge of the subject was helpful in our travels abroad or when welcoming foreign guests to our shores. The complexities of merging corporate cultures, issues of leadership, planning, decision-making, recruitment and task assignment are all compromised by the nation-traits of the people involved. What allowances must be made when outlining organisational culture?

Cross culture comparison of leadership traits

Typically though, most leaders use a primary style in their management approach. According to the "International Journal of Cross Cultural Management," leadership traits result partly from cultural norms and partly from the needs of the leadership job. Cultures differ regarding the use of power.

People who act to maximize their personal gain behave as individualists. Collectivists, on the other hand, are expected to act to help the community. By acknowledging these differences, leaders improve their ability to function while conducting global business. Autocratic Style Autocratic leaders make all the decisions for their departments and tend to show little concern for individuals.

The Lewis Model – Dimensions of Behaviour | Cross Culture

Typically, this results in high rates of low morale, absenteeism and employee turnover. In a crisis situation, such as a natural disaster, autocratic behavior tends to get the best results. However, effective leaders realize that motivating and inspiring employees on a daily basis leads to greater employee satisfaction and productivity.

In collectivist cultures, employees expect leaders to focus on tasks but also show concern toward people. For example, Gregorio Billikopf, labor management farm advisor at the University of California, observes that Latin Americans make more eye contact and face each other more.

Leaders from these countries tend to be less autocratic and more sensitive to employee needs. Bureaucratic Style Bureaucratic leaders set up rules and want them followed precisely. For example, according to the "Cambridge Handbook of Culture, Organizations, and Work," employees in western countries, such as the United States and Germany, have an independent concept of self.

Leaders distance themselves from their employees. They tend not to nurture employees and accept mistakes. In these individualistic cultures, leaders prefer to maintain professional relationships. Charismatic Style Leaders who inspire their employees establish a vision and communicate it with passion and enthusiasm.

Cross Culture Comparison of Leadership Traits - New York Essays

A charismatic leader establishes an organization with dedicated followers who believe in his mission. In individualist cultures, these types of leaders focus on accomplishing tasks and tend to accept paternalism, a hierarchy based on a fatherly leader. According to the "Cambridge Handbook of Culture, Organizations and Work," 80 percent of the Japanese surveyed accepted paternalism as compared with only 51 percent of Americans surveyed.

Cross culture comparison of leadership traits

Democratic Style Democratic leaders involve their subordinates in decision making processes. Team members feel like they have control over their work. Democratic leaders motivate their personnel to solve problems themselves. Collectivists, such as the Japanese, tend to sacrifice individual needs for the whole group.Request PDF on ResearchGate | A Cross Cultural Comparison of the Importance of Leadership Traits for Effective Low-level and High-level LeadersAustralia and China | This study compares perceptions of the importance of 18 traits for effective low-level leaders and high-level leaders.

Cross-cultural comparison of cultural mythologies and leadership patterns Wong-MingJi, a) to extract the most favored leadership traits within selected countries.

Cultural traditions and values play a role in a leader's style. According to the "International Journal of Cross Cultural Management," leadership traits result partly from cultural norms and. Typically though, most leaders use a primary style in their management approach. Cultural traditions and values play a role in a leader's style. According to the "International Journal of Cross Cultural Management," leadership traits result partly from cultural norms and partly from the needs of the leadership job. Cross Culture Comparison of Leadership Traits for Low-level & High-level Leaders: China & Australia The article is based on report on research conducted, which shows the study of comparing perceptions of the importance of 18 traits for effective low-level leaders and high-level leaders.

In . CROSS-CULTURAL COMPARISON OF LEADERSHIP PROTOTYPES Charlotte R. Gerstner* David V. Day Pennsylvania State University Despite the recognized importance of leadership in organizational contexts, relatively few studies have examined the concept of leadership in various cultures.

Typically though, most leaders use a primary style in their management approach. Cultural traditions and values play a role in a leader's style.

Cross culture comparison of leadership traits

According to the "International Journal of Cross Cultural Management," leadership traits result partly from cultural norms and partly from the needs of the leadership job. Cross Culture Comparison of Leadership Traits for Low-level & High-level Leaders: China & Australia The article is based on report on research conducted, which shows the study of comparing perceptions of the importance of 18 traits for effective low-level leaders and high-level leaders.

A Cross Cultural Comparison of the Importance of Leadership Traits for Effective Low-level and High-level Leaders Australia and China Show all authors.

Cross-cultural comparison of leadership prototypes - ScienceDirect